On a classiness scale of 1 (Branson) to 10 (Newport), Nashville is a perfect 5.

On the one hand, the people are attractive, the food is excellent, and tonight I’m going to see an outdoor performance of “The Taming of the Shrew.” You know, classy.

On the other hand, there’s the Nashville Parthenon.

It's glorious.

It's glorious.

The Parthenon is a life-size replica of THE Parthenon. I know this seems confusing, so here’s a little help:

Athens Parthenon: Built from limestone and marble in the 5th century BC.
Nashville Parthenon: Built from wood, plaster and brick in 1897, rebuilt in concrete in beginning in 1920.

Athens Parthenon: built to honor the goddess Athena
Nashville Parthenon: built to honor the 100th anniversary of Tennessee’s entry into the Union (it was a year late).

Athens Parthenon: “the most perfect Doric temple ever built.”
Nashville Parthenon: an exact concrete copy of “the most perfect Doric temple ever built.”

Fun bonus fact: the poet Randall Jarrell, who grew up in Nashville, posed for the statue of Ganymede on the replica’s frieze at age 6.

Goddess of all I survey.

Goddess of all I survey.

 

It's just like I said: a life-size concrete replica of the Parthenon.

It's just like I said: a life-size concrete replica of the Parthenon.

(I have a weakness for life-size replicas of cultural treasures constructed out of inferior materials: This spring, my sister and I made a pilgrimage to Virginia’s Foamhenge, which is — really, you can probably guess — a life-size foam replica of Stonehenge.)

Next up: Andrew Jackson, a duel, and a freshly dug-up body.

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6 responses to “On a classiness scale of 1 (Branson) to 10 (Newport), Nashville is a perfect 5.

  1. The Parthenon always brings a smile to my face when we drive by. But enough about replicas, tell me you tried fried pickles!

  2. I wish your whole road trip was just visiting life-size replicas of things. Is it too late to reconsider?

  3. This is not the place to dwell on how correctly Stalin had defined the composition of the blocs. That is not in question here. Lenin was waging a desperate struggle against the legalists, liquidators and opportunists, for the perspective of the second revolution. All the groupings abroad at that time were fundamentally determined by that struggle. But how did the Bolshevik, Stalin, evaluate these battles? Like the most inept empiricist: “A tempest in a teapot; let them climb the walls; keep on working, the rest will take care of itself.” Stalin welcomes the mood of indifference to theory and the presumed superiority of myopic “practicals” over revolutionary theorists. “This, in my opinion is for the best”, he writes with reference to those moods which were characteristic of the period of reaction and decline. Thus, in the person of Stalin, the Bolshevik, we have not even political conciliationism – for, conciliationism was an ideological tendency, which attempted to create a principled platform – we have blind empiricism, verging on complete disregard of the principled problems of the revolution.

  4. Hey Ruth,

    You might want to try installing a comment filter or approval system of some sort. Might help keep out the crazies, you know?

    Just saying…

  5. Pingback: What’s the most appalling statue in Nashville? (Hint: It ain’t no cowboy.) « Public Road

  6. Jacob, I just can’t use this one. Sorry.

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